Balkan mythology

The Balkans is more than an important area for the whole Europe, partly because of the rich history, but also because of the treasures that it hides. From the mineral resources and the big and colorful nature, to the legends and myths, the Balkans is very warm and nice place to start your life. But, be aware, this land has much bigger secrets than you can even imagine! Hold yourself and discover the world of magical creatures that reside within this territory. In this part, you will find what lies beneath the water surface.

These are just some of the water creatures hidden in the Danube, Sava and other rivers all over the Balkans. These water demons are the oldest fairy creatures on the Balkans.

Unlike all others that throughout the time decreased in number and ran away in the deep forest and caves, Danube demons have the same population. They only live in fresh water. Beneath the sad look lies one happy and frivolous fella. They are only capable of making a few jokes or gags just to scare or do a bit harm to passersby.

Nothing too evil. Vodenjaci are the most typical representatives of water ghosts on the Balkans. They are always males since their female forms are actually water fairies, or so-called rusalke. Vodenjaci are very short, black and hairy, and these creatures also have hats and long beards. No, they are not hipsters!

The myth goes that vodenjaci are actually part horses since they have hoofs. Evil and sinister, vodenjaci will gladly drown passersby, so be careful around them.

These creatures can call you by the name, and legend goes that if you call back, you have to die. Older vodenjaci are always more malicious than young ones, and because of that if you get caught by old vodenjak there are small chances for you to survive.

In rare cases, vodenjaci did actually help fishermen, but they always ask a lot in return. There is a myth that says how some people stayed eternally in possession of these evil beings. These creatures are water fairies. Rusalke live near vodenjaci, but some of them also live alone in lakes and rivers. The thing that separates them from ordinary fairies is that they are always naked. This species of fairies has their own queen that summons them with a horn, but nevertheless, all of them are subservient to the king of vodenjaci.Paleo-Balkan mythology includes the religious practices of the DaciansThraciansand Illyrians.

Little is known about the rituals and mythology of the Iron Age Balkans, but some of their gods are depicted in statuary or described in Greek sources. One notable cult, attested from Thrace to Moesia and Scythia Minor, is that of the "Thracian horseman", also known as the "Thracian Heros", at Odessos Varna attested by a Thracian name as Heros Karabazmosa god of the underworld usually depicted on funeral statues as a horseman slaying a beast with a spear.

The mythology of the Illyrians is only known through mention of Illyrian deities on Roman period monuments, some with interpretatio Romana. The Illyrians did not develop a uniform cosmology on which to center their religious practices. In Liburnia, Anzotica is identified with Venus. Other local theonyms [12] include LatraSentona and Ica. Bindusidentified with Neptunewas worshipped among the Japodes.

From the eastern Balkans, the cult of the Thracian horseman spread to Illyria during the early centuries CE. The god Medaurus [16] mentioned in a dedication at Lambaesis in Africa by a Roman senator and native of Risinium appears to be identical to the horseman, being described as riding on horseback and carrying a lance.

balkan mythology

The Delmatae had Armatus as a god of war. Sign In Don't have an account? Dictionary of Gods and Goddesses, Devils and Demons. Bulgarian Folklore.

Thracian religion

See Orel, Vladimir. A Handbook of Germanic Etymology. Leiden, Netherlands: Brill, Said to have been so called from the bear's skin zalmos in which he was clothed as soon as he was born. He was, according to the story current among the Greeks on the Hellespont, a Getan, who had been a slave to Pythagoras in Samos, but was manumitted, and acquired not only great wealth, but large stores of knowledge from Pythagoras, and from the Egyptians, whom he visited in the course of his travels.

balkan mythology

He returned among the Getae, introducing the civilization and the religious ideas which he had gained, especially regarding the immortality of the soul. Herodotus, however, suspects that he was an indigenous Getan divinity Herod. This Zamolxis, as I have been informed by those Greeks who inhabit the Hellespont and the Euxine, was himself a man, and formerly lived at Samos, in the service of Pythagoras, son of Mnesarchus; having obtained his liberty, with considerable wealth, he returned to his country.

Here he found the Thracians distinguished equally by their profligacy and their ignorance; whilst he himself had been accustomed to the Ionian mode of life, and to manners more polished than those of Thrace; he had also been connected with Pythagoras, one of the most celebrated philosophers of Greece. He was therefore induced to build a large mansion, to which he invited the most eminent of his fellow-citizens: he took the opportunity of the festive hour to assure them, that neither himself, his guests, nor any of their descendants, should ever die, but should be removed to a place, where they were to remain in the perpetual enjoyment of every blessing.

After saying this, and conducting himself accordingly, he constructed a subterranean edifice: when it was completed, he withdrew himself from the sight of his countrymen, and resided for three years beneath the earth.

balkan mythology

In the fourth year he again appeared among them, and by this artifice gave the appearance of probability to what he had before asserted. These Getse, using the ceremonies I have described, after submitting themselves to the Persians under Darius, followed his army.

The Illyrians, p. Illyrian deities are named on monuments of the Roman era, some in equation with gods of the classical pantheon see figure An etymology of the Illyrian name linked with serpent would, if it is true, fit with the many representations of Anzotica was the Liburnian Venus and appears in the traditional image of the classical goddess. The first reported contact between Japodes and Romans occurred Armatus at Delminium Duvno who was evidently a war god of the Delmatae, and the Latin Liber who appears with the Categories :.

This page uses content from the English Wikipedia. The original article was at Paleo-Balkan mythology. The list of authors can be seen in the page history.Thracian religion includes the religious practices of the Thracians. Little is known about their mythology and rituals, but some of their gods are depicted in statuary or described in Greek sources. One notable cult, attested from Thrace to Moesia and Scythia Minoris that of the " Thracian horseman ", also known as the "Thracian Heros", at Odessos Varna attested by a Thracian name as Heros Karabazmosa god of the underworld usually depicted on funeral statues as a horseman slaying a beast with a spear.

Kogaionon was the name of a holy mountain of the Dacians. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Redirected from Thracian mythology. Dictionary of Gods and Goddesses, Devils and Demons.

Bulgarian Folklore. Eurasisches Magazin in German. Retrieved 19 January Die Thrakische Sprachreste. Wien, p. See Orel, Vladimir. A Handbook of Germanic Etymology. Leiden, Netherlands: Brill, Kendrick University of California Press. Indo-European Poetry and Myth. OUP Oxford. Encyclopedia of Indo-European Culture. Said to have been so called from the bear's skin zalmos in which he was clothed as soon as he was born.

He was, according to the story current among the Greeks on the Hellespont, a Getan, who had been a slave to Pythagoras in Samos, but was manumitted, and acquired not only great wealth, but large stores of knowledge from Pythagoras, and from the Egyptians, whom he visited in the course of his travels.

He returned among the Getae, introducing the civilization and the religious ideas which he had gained, especially regarding the immortality of the soul. Herodotus, however, suspects that he was an indigenous Getan divinity Herod. This Zamolxis, as I have been informed by those Greeks who inhabit the Hellespont and the Euxine, was himself a man, and formerly lived at Samos, in the service of Pythagoras, son of Mnesarchus; having obtained his liberty, with considerable wealth, he returned to his country.

Here he found the Thracians distinguished equally by their profligacy and their ignorance; whilst he himself had been accustomed to the Ionian mode of life, and to manners more polished than those of Thrace; he had also been connected with Pythagoras, one of the most celebrated philosophers of Greece. He was therefore induced to build a large mansion, to which he invited the most eminent of his fellow-citizens: he took the opportunity of the festive hour to assure them, that neither himself, his guests, nor any of their descendants, should ever die, but should be removed to a place, where they were to remain in the perpetual enjoyment of every blessing.

After saying this, and conducting himself accordingly, he constructed a subterranean edifice: when it was completed, he withdrew himself from the sight of his countrymen, and resided for three years beneath the earth. In the fourth year he again appeared among them, and by this artifice gave the appearance of probability to what he had before asserted. These Getse, using the ceremonies I have described, after submitting themselves to the Persians under Darius, followed his army.Bukura e dheut A benevolent fairy.

She lives in a castle which is guarded by many wonderful creatures and has contact with the underworld. Occasionally identified as Bukura e dheut.

Bukuri i qiellit The name for god. This deity was originally one of the three gods of sky, ocean and underworld. Occasionally called Bukuri i qiellit. Kukuth An Albanian female demon causing. On occassion, called Kukuth, Kukudhi or Kukudhi. Kulsheder An Albanian male demon. Also commonly identified as Kulsheder, femaleKulshedra or femaleKulshedra. Ljubi An Albanian female demon. She causes drought which can be lifted only by the sacrifice of a virgin. Also commonly known as Ljubi. Martin Krpan A Slovene hero who was an attendant of the Viennese emperor.

Identified as Martin Krpan. Ora An Albanian guardian goddess. It is said that each person has its own Ora to provide protection. Also commonly identified as Ora.

Perit Albanian mountain spirits. It was said that these spirits could punish people who wasted food by making them hunchbacked.Paleo-Balkan mythology includes the religious practices of the DaciansThraciansand Illyrians. Little is known about the rituals and mythology of the Iron Age Balkansbut some of their gods are depicted in statuary or described in Greek sources. One notable cult, attested from Thrace to Moesia and Scythia Minoris that of the " Thracian horseman ", also known as the "Thracian Heros", at Odessos Varna attested by a Thracian name as Heros Karabazmosa god of the underworld usually depicted on funeral statues as a horseman slaying a beast with a spear.

Kogaionon was the name of a holy mountain of the Dacians. The mythology of the Illyrians is only known through mention of Illyrian deities on Roman period monuments, some with interpretatio Romana. The Illyrians did not develop a uniform cosmology on which to center their religious practices. In LiburniaAnzotica is identified with Venus.

Other local theonyms [13] include LatraSentona and Ica. Bindusidentified with Neptunewas worshipped among the Japodes. From the eastern Balkans, the cult of the Thracian horseman spread to Illyria during the early centuries AD. The god Medaurus [17] mentioned in a dedication at Lambaesis in Africa by a Roman senator and native of Risinium appears to be identical to the horseman, being described as riding on horseback and carrying a lance.

The Delmatae had Armatus as a god of war.

Balkan Folklore

From Infogalactic: the planetary knowledge core. Jump to: navigationsearch. Dictionary of Gods and Goddesses, Devils and Demons. Bulgarian Folklore.

Die Thrakische Sprachreste. Wien, p. See Orel, Vladimir. A Handbook of Germanic Etymology.

10 Dark Slavic Legends

Leiden, Netherlands: Brill, Said to have been so called from the bear's skin zalmos in which he was clothed as soon as he was born. He was, according to the story current among the Greeks on the Hellespont, a Getan, who had been a slave to Pythagoras in Samos, but was manumitted, and acquired not only great wealth, but large stores of knowledge from Pythagoras, and from the Egyptians, whom he visited in the course of his travels.

He returned among the Getae, introducing the civilization and the religious ideas which he had gained, especially regarding the immortality of the soul. Herodotus, however, suspects that he was an indigenous Getan divinity Herod. This Zamolxis, as I have been informed by those Greeks who inhabit the Hellespont and the Euxine, was himself a man, and formerly lived at Samos, in the service of Pythagoras, son of Mnesarchus; having obtained his liberty, with considerable wealth, he returned to his country.

Here he found the Thracians distinguished equally by their profligacy and their ignorance; whilst he himself had been accustomed to the Ionian mode of life, and to manners more polished than those of Thrace; he had also been connected with Pythagoras, one of the most celebrated philosophers of Greece.

He was therefore induced to build a large mansion, to which he invited the most eminent of his fellow-citizens: he took the opportunity of the festive hour to assure them, that neither himself, his guests, nor any of their descendants, should ever die, but should be removed to a place, where they were to remain in the perpetual enjoyment of every blessing. After saying this, and conducting himself accordingly, he constructed a subterranean edifice: when it was completed, he withdrew himself from the sight of his countrymen, and resided for three years beneath the earth.

In the fourth year he again appeared among them, and by this artifice gave the appearance of probability to what he had before asserted. These Getse, using the ceremonies I have described, after submitting themselves to the Persians under Darius, followed his army.

The Illyrians, p. Illyrian deities are named on monuments of the Roman era, some in equation with gods of the classical pantheon see figure An etymology of the Illyrian name linked with serpent would, if it is true, fit with the many representations of Anzotica was the Liburnian Venus and appears in the traditional image of the classical goddess.

The first reported contact between Japodes and Romans occurred Armatus at Delminium Duvno who was evidently a war god of the Delmatae, and the Latin Liber who appears with theMythology and folklore are a riveting domain no matter what part of the world they originate from.

Tales from different regions are often shaped by geography and by cultural and historical factors that have accumulated over the course of centuries. Different experiences stand behind the invention of different mythical beings. At the core of all myth and legend, however, stands a desire to understand the world better, to explain the experience of living and all that it entails.

balkan mythology

Most of us are familiar to one degree or another with Greek and Roman mythology and have seen a thing or two from Western European mythology, if only in the form of faeries and leprechauns. The Balkan Peninsula, a region in Southeastern Europe, is an area full of rich history and tradition where cultures have been mixing for at least 2, years and Slavic civilization has had an especially strong influence.

The result is diverse and fascinating folklore with its own set of mythical beings and legendary heroes. It is commonly depicted in the traditional gigantic scaly form and often has three heads that all breathe fire. In some tales, the zmey is responsible for natural disasters, while in others it requires the nearby villages to leave young women as sacrifices or as wives for the zmey.

Mysterious Balkan Creatures: Underneath the Water

A main enemy of the evil zmey in a lot of stories is Perunone of the main and most powerful gods in Slavic mythology. Perun is the creator of lightning and thunder and the guardian of troops in battle. The samodiva is a forest spirit in the shape of a beautiful woman who never loses her youthful looks. The samodivi bathe in forest springs underneath the moonlight and sometimes make young bachelors from the nearby villages play the kaval a wooden flute for them.

If a man steals a samodiva's veil, she becomes an ordinary woman and has to be his wife, but will spend every moment she can looking for her veil to regain her freedom, even if it means leaving her children behind. The samodivi also protect forest animals. Other creatures in Slavic mythology include demons, forest spirits and giants.

Vampires joined the ranks of feared beings in the Middle Ages and onwards as well, especially in countries like Serbia. A dhampir is the offspring of a vampire and a human. During the Ottoman Empire's dominion over the Balkans, many legends began featuring brave fighters for freedom, courageous young women who didn't yield to the Ottoman's attempts to take them as wives and who viewed the Ottomans as hated antagonists. In more recent news, a team of Bulgarian animators is working on a series inspired by Slavic mythology and folklore.In what are the present-day Balkans, ancient Slavic migrants encountered and at least partly assimilated Albanian-speaking Indo-Europeans, whose linguistic Access to the complete content on Oxford Reference requires a subscription or purchase.

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Paleo-Balkan mythology

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